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Egnyte and Raken vs. Construction Litigation

Employee Niamh
Employee
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According to the Arcadis Research Global Construction Disputes Report, the average construction dispute in North America takes a little over 17 months to settle. With an average dispute value of $19 million, that is a costly venture for any size firm. So where did these disputes come from? According to Arcadis, the most common sources were errors or omissions in the contract document, failure to deliver on the contract, and the GC/Subcontractor failing to understand or comply with the contract. You'll notice that each of the top three reasons for construction litigation all had to do with documentation, fulfilling contractual obligations in particular. To protect themselves against these most common types of litigation, general and subcontractors have one sometimes overlooked tool that is a big help in each situation: the daily report. 

A construction daily report is a record of what happened on a construction site that day. It records the comings and goings of personnel and equipment and lists out what was accomplished that day while noting any quality control or safety concerns. The daily report, properly done, is a record of the contractor's work that they can use, should litigation arise, to prove that they fulfilled their contractual obligations to the letter. 

However, there can be a difficulty in getting superintendents and foremen, the individuals responsible for the daily report, to complete them accurately and on time. Historically the daily report has been done on pen and paper and then transcribed into an Excel spreadsheet or word doc. These important documents were then printed and stored in binders that inevitably found themselves collecting dust in a trailer on a jobsite somewhere, forgotten until the day comes when an old site has a grievance with some of the work that was done and asks to see a report. Enter the hours of searching through those binders for a particular entry. Enter the frustration when that day comes up with a hastily-scribbled, incomplete report or worse, no report at all. Enter the legal team that now has to clean up the mess. 

Raken and Egnyte partnered to solve this sticky problem for construction companies everywhere. Raken is a daily reporting and field management software that makes the process of generating the report quick and easy. Users can complete a report on their mobile device, taking photos and capturing information as they walk the site, turning a process that used to take hours into one that takes minutes at best. 

However, completing the report is only half the battle. To get the most use out of it, those reports have to be stored and shared in such a way that finding them when they are needed isn't an issue. By utilizing the Raken and Egnyte Connect integration for daily reporting and cloud storage, construction firms are able to sync a project’s Raken daily reports, subcontractors daily reports, files, videos, and photos with its Egnyte Connect project folder. Files now are automatically organized within a clean folder hierarchy, placing all construction documents into one easy-to-access location. Once a superintendent or foreman signs their daily report, it's automatically synced to an Egnyte project folder where it's securely stored alongside their other important construction documents. By utilizing this integration, a construction firm's daily reports, subcontractor reports, and photos are now available to all stakeholders involved in the construction project, alongside other critical project files. Superintendents will no longer need to manually download and transfer their daily reports and field photos in order to share them with the wider team.

By using Raken and Egnyte together, construction firms around the world are transforming a normally stressful workflow into an automated, effective way to protect themselves and prove the value of their work in the future.